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  • Writer's pictureRic Armstrong

What You Need to Know About the Legal Classification of Workers in Texas


The legal classification of workers in Texas is important for both employers and employees. It determines the rights and responsibilities of each party and can have a significant impact on taxes, benefits, and liability. In Texas, the law uses a "right to control" test to determine whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor. This means that the employer must have the right to control the worker's work, including the following:

  • The methods and means of performing the work

  • The hours and days of work

  • The location of the work

  • The quality and quantity of the work

If the employer has the right to control these factors, then the worker is generally considered an employee. However, there are some factors that can weigh in favor of independent contractor status, such as:

  • The worker has a separate business or occupation

  • The worker has their own tools and equipment

  • The worker is paid by the job, not by the hour

  • The worker is free to set their own hours and work location

Ultimately, the determination of whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor is a factual one that will be made on a case-by-case basis. Here are some of the key differences between employees and independent contractors in Texas:

  • Taxes: Employees are responsible for paying income taxes, FICA taxes, and unemployment taxes. Independent contractors are responsible for paying self-employment taxes.

  • Benefits: Employees are entitled to benefits such as health insurance, paid sick leave, and retirement plans. Independent contractors are not entitled to these benefits.

  • Liability: Employers are liable for the actions of their employees while they are on the job. Independent contractors are generally not liable for the actions of their clients.

Misclassifying a worker can have serious consequences for both employers and employees. For employers, misclassification can lead to fines, penalties, and back taxes. For employees, misclassification can mean that they miss out on benefits and protections.


If you are unsure whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor, you should consult with an attorney. An attorney can help you understand the law and make the correct classification decision. Here are some additional things to keep in mind about the legal classification of workers in Texas:

  • The law can be complex, and there is no one-size-fits-all answer.

  • classification of a worker can change over time.

  • The classification of a worker can be challenged by the government or by the worker.

It's important to document the factors that support the classification decision.

By understanding the legal classification of workers in Texas, you can help ensure that you are in compliance with the law and that your employees are protected.

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